The Amplifying Quality of Group Therapy

Although the concept of group therapy is not new to long-term care, the implementation of the Patient Driven Payment Model (PDPM) has ignited renewed interest in its utilization during a skilled stay. From the resource availability to expand restorative nursing programs that allow up to four skilled residents in a group, to the revised group definition under Section O of the RAI manual, it is highly likely the clinician, staff, and patient interaction throughout a stay will reflect an exciting environment of peer motivation and social engagement.  

Prior to PDPM, if a therapy clinician executed a group with skilled residents participating, the group had to be planned for no more nor less than four individuals. Now, when a skilled resident is included in a group, the clinician has the autonomy to mold the size of the group to include anywhere from two to six participants, as appropriate. The psycho-social benefits and opportunity to apply functional carryover techniques within a quality, patient-centered group have not changed.

As noted by CMS and in multiple research studies, the psycho-social benefits of group are varied and include enhanced learning, increased sense of support, decreased depression, and improved motivation. Consider the story of a skilled patient who planned to return home alone. Prior to the event that led to the skilled stay, she participated in social outings once a week and depended heavily on loved ones to drop by for social interaction. Her family and friends encouraged her to “get out more”, but due to a self-perceived burden and a touch of embarrassment over her functional changes, she frequently declined the invitations. Eventually, this unintentional social isolation led to depression, sadness, and declining functional health. In her weakened functional state, she fell and although no fractures or breaks resulted, she did admit to the hospital due to altered mental status, dehydration, and mild malnutrition. Once stabilized, she admitted to a skilled nursing facility with the hope her weakened state could be reasonably reversed for a safe return home. During her stay, she participated in a physical therapy group once a week in addition to her daily individual therapy. Knowing her history, the clinician formulated a peer group identifying patients with similar goals targeting gait and balance, with the knowledge that this patient needed the peer motivation and example for attaining and maintaining her functional gains once she discharged home. During those sessions, the patient was encouraged by the evidence that her story was not unique and allowed her to self-identify the functional and emotional effects of isolation all while achieving her physical therapy goals.

Group therapy presents the unique opportunity for the therapy practitioner or restorative nursing staff to engage the patient during their care journey in novel ways. As a result, success is often amplified due to the underlying qualities inherent within group formats that simply cannot be mirrored in individual treatment sessions.  Whether delivered by restorative aides as part of a nursing program or by therapy clinicians as part of a rehabilitation stay, there is magic in the makeup of a group that is created with patient-centered intention and guided by staff who recognize the benefits of community and teamwork.

Leave a Reply